Friday, 21 December 2012

who reach the goal?

HARI  OM  

 Practical   steps  to  spirituality  -  section  5  part  42

Shrimad   Bhagawad  gita - part  158

Chapter  15   

                            The   students  aspiring  to  know  the  Divine   must   learn  to  withdraw  more  and  more   from   their  preoccupation  with  perceptions,  emotions    and  thoughts.  and  must  contemplate  more  and  more  on  the  Divine  ,  the  Higher. .. When  the  mind-intellect    has  retired  from   the  introverted  pursuits  ,  the  intellect  has  to  be  consciously  turned  ,with  an  attitude  of  shraddha  and  devotion   and  surrender  ,  to  the   Divine. 

                         Arjuna  wants  to  know  what  kind  of  seekers  reach  the  goal  ? . Lord  Krishna    says  "  free  from  pride   and  delusion  ,  victorious  over  the  evil  of  attachment  ,  dwelling  constantly  in  the  Self  ,  their  desire  having  completely    come  to   an  end    ,  free  from  the  pairs  of  opposites  such  as  pleasure and  pain,    honour and  dishonour  ,  the  undeluded  reach  that  goal  Eternal. . Pride  and  delusion  indicate   a  false  sense  of  exaggerated    estimate  of  oneself   and    others. . Vedanta  always  insists  on  detachment  from  the  worldly  pursuits  . Sankaracarya  in  his  Bhaja  Govindam  says  it  is  always  an  attachment   to    wealth  or   pleasure   that  drives  a  man  to  worldly  pursuits.

                    Detachment  from  the  finite  is  possible  only  when  one  attaches  oneself  to  something  higher  and  nobler , the  Infinite. .  Desire  is  the  function  of  the  intellect   and  when  the  intellect  desires  ,  the  mind  starts  dreaming   about  that  object  of  desire  . So  the  intellect  must  be  educated  not  to  desire  the  finite  objects    and  where  desires  have  ended   the  mind  becomes  still  . . And  his  mind  then  becomes  fit  to  contemplate  on  the  Divine. 

to  be  continued......

No comments:

Post a Comment